Byung-jin Lim

PhD, Linguistics, Indiana University

Director, Korean Flagship Program

byungjin.lim@wisc.edu

(608) 262-3341

1214 Van Hise, 1220 Linden Drive
Department of Asian Languages and Cultures

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Byung-jin Lim (Ph.D. in Linguistics, 2003) is the author of Perceiving Syllables and Contrasts: Second Language Learning Perspectives (Korea University Press, 2015) which investigates the decoding process of speech chains whereby a continuous speech stream in a language is broken into meaningful units such that the information carried in the units is relayed to listeners, and thus the intention of the speaker is accurately interpreted by the listeners. In the book, Lim proposes an organic language acquisition model for bilinguals, which shows that bilinguals share the phonetic categories of native (L1) and target (L2) languages, and the different stages of acquisition of the L2 indicate differing degrees of language dominance by one of the languages.

Lim also began a research project entitled “Videoconferencing for the Korean Language Program at UW-Madison” which aimed at developing intercultural communicative competence and linguistic competence by providing learners of Korean with the target language and culture through Internet-based videoconferencing. Lim’s research publications (2011, 2015, 2016, 2018) resulting from the videoconferencing project show that language learners can benefit from authentic experiences that promote linguistic skills and intercultural learning through telecollaborative activities using videoconferencing with native speakers of the target language.

With U.S. students’ needs in mind, Lim launched a Korean language textbook development project ‘My Korean.’ The project is contracted with Routledge for publication, My Korean: Step 1 will be released early 2019. Lim is currently working on the manuscript of My Korean: Step 2.

In his teaching at UW-Madison Lim always works to make a difference in the lives of his students. As an educator, he strongly believes in his mission to provide healthy, creative and supportive environments to a diverse student population so that they can learn, grow, and explore their dreams without any limitations. Lim has taught and coordinated all of the Korean language courses (Elementary Korean I & II, Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh and Eighth Semester Korean) at UW-Madison. His Korean language classroom is student-centered because it reflects the diverse backgrounds and needs of his students. He works to validate his students’ unique experiences and their backgrounds through their Korean language learning.